Wristwatch Revamp (sort of a tutorial?)

I love watches! In fact, I have a lot of them. As of this year, I have six watches I regularly use. That doesn’t include the one my grandma gave me that’s no longer wear and a sports watch a friend gave me.

I never leave without wearing one. I don’t know why, but if I don’t wear one I feel naked. Even if I have my smartphone to tell me the time, I still can’t go out without wearing one. Unless I’m in a real hurry and I forget to grab a watch, I really must wear one. Otherwise, I’ll feel really naked-dream uncomfortable.

Now there’s this watch that I really, really love. Wherever I go, I always pick it out of the five from my watch box (yes, if you have a jewelry box, I have a watch box). So anyway, about three months or so ago, its loops got torn. Since then, I’ve been wearing this watch with the band sticking out — which is really ruins my catwalk.

I’ve been meaning to replace the band with a new strap, but I’ve been surfing the internet and I’ve stumbled upon a blog of a DIY Art Deco watch that gave me an idea. And because it’s been a long time since I last did an arts and crafts project, I decided to give at go.

However, there was one problem. Most of the materials used in the tutorial are nowhere to be found the city’s major malls, so I had to make do with what I have. Fortunately, I have some leftover stuff from my handmade jewelry business from last year so I just improvised.

Here’s what I did:

 

1. Remove the original band.
2. Insert ribbon into the chain’s hole.
3. With a pair of pliers, connect the chain to the spring bar.
4. Insert a grosgrain ribbon on the other spring bar.
5. Sew the grosgrain ribbon in place.
6. Loop a short chain and connect lobster claw.
7.  A Flower I made using mother of pearls and crystals.
8. Glue gun the flower on the grosgrain ribbon and viola!

So, there. It wasn’t that hard. I started when Josh took his afternoon nap. When he woke up, I was already trying out my “new” watch. Awesome, right? It took me less than 30 minutes to make it.

Now, I can’t wait to wear it tomorrow at church.
Got to go! Have a nice weekend!

 

Pure in Heart

Just last week, I saw a McDonald’s TV commercial, and I feel in love with it. I know it’s just an ad but it’s not all the time you can see such brotherly love and respect, especially when the the older one is what you call a special child.

Don’t know what I’m talking about? Check this out:

 

(For those who can’t understand, I apologize. It’s a 
TV commercial for the Philippines only. I think)
 

So, anyway, one of the reasons I love this television advertisement is that it reminds me of an experience I had just two weeks ago.

After a doctor’s appointment, I rushed outside from the building and hastily walked to the jeepney stop. It was getting late in the afternoon, so I couldn’t wait to get home to tell my hubby about my meeting with the doctor. When I saw that traffic congestion was starting to build up along Osmeña Boulevard, and the public jeepneys were mostly full, I knew there was a slim chance for me to get a ride quickly.

Not wanting to stand there on the PUJ stop for hours on end on a hot, humid and very polluted avenue, I braced myself for some “wrestling” with other would-be passengers. Luckily, I didn’t have to because I spotted a jeep who just needs one petite passenger before they roll, me.

So, I got on the jeep, even though I knew I won’t be able to fit my entire bottom on the seat, just so I can get home. When I managed to squeeze in half of my butt on the seat, I suddenly heard a young male’s voice across me calling out to his mom. When I looked up, I saw a young boy of about 11 or 12 years old gesturing to his mom, telling her to move a little to her left so that the girl, meaning me, can sit without slipping over the seat.

When I realized what he was trying to do, I hid my surprise with a smile because of the sweet gesture he did for me. He was a young boy with Down syndrome but still had the heart to think of others. I’ve been riding public utility jeeps all my life, and I’ve never experienced something like it. And to think, his mom was carrying a month-old baby, the air was hot and sticky, and the jeep was cramped. I mean you could practically hear the person beside you breathing. That’s how full it was. Yet, he still thought of somebody else. If he was just normal person, I doubt if he’d ask his mom to do that. He’ll probably even care less as long he’s seated comfortably.

Since that episode, I couldn’t help but smile at him. I thought to myself how I wish I can repay him for his kindness. If only I have the means to. But then, I told myself I’ll just pay it forward. Whenever I ride a cramped jeep, I’ll try to help a passenger who’s having a hard time seating properly.

Going back to the TV commercial. After seeing it, I told JJ about my experience, and he told me that a lot of people who have down syndrome are pure in heart.  That may sound like a bold statement, but I guess there’s some truth in that because a lot of the folks we know, from classmates to neighbors, who have the condition are selfless, kind and helpful. Perhaps you’ll want to recall someone you know?

Josh also added, everyone should be like them, kind and never selfish. And I couldn’t agree more. In fact, people who are completely, genetically normal should be more kind and selfless, like them, because they have the physical, mental and emotional ability to do so unlike people with congenital disabilities.

Such experience taught me a lot. It reminds me of what Jesus Christ taught us that we should be like little children: meek, gentle, patient, and pure in heart. Although the lesson I’ve learned is not going to change me completely, because it doesn’t happen that way, my experienced has influenced me to change one step at a time.

Dear Cancer

black-and-white-person-woman-girl

Dear Cancer,

If you’re just a zodiac sign or a constellation in the sky, I would’ve loved you. Don’t get me wrong. I like reading my daily horoscope even if I know it’s just a waste of my time. And I also love gazing at the stars on a clear night.

 

Sadly, you’re not just a part of the constellation or a zodiac sign but also a disease that has killed millions, if not billions, and has afflicted millions of other unsuspecting individuals.

 

You have caused many people their lives and have taken away mothers, fathers, children, friends, uncles, aunts, grandmothers, cousins and many others from the people they love. You strike without warning and you give those you have afflicted a slow death.

 

First, you took my grandma. Second, my dear aunt. Now, my mother is suffering because of you. But you didn’t stop. You just continually go on your way causing havoc to anyone who comes your way. Lately, I heard that you’ve afflicted one of my childhood friends with one of your abnormally mutating killer cells. He’s still young to suffer such fate.

 

Why did you have to exist? If Pandora’s box was real, you should’ve stayed in it. Can’t you see? A lot of people are suffering and dying because of you. People are going to hate you. Others will dread you. Scientist are going to find a cure to get rid of you, and I pray that they find it fast before you take away all our friends families.

 

Please know that once you’re gone, I’m definitely not going to miss you.

 

Sincerely,
The daughter of a cancer-stricken mom.

 

P.S.
My heart goes out to all those who are stricken with cancer and their families. Know that you’re not alone. Be strong and have faith. My condolences to the families who have lost someone in the battle.

 

Families Are Forever.